NVIDIA GRID vGPU 1.1 for Citrix XenServer 6.2SP1

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in Citrix

NVIDIA have released a new NVIDIA vGPU 1.1

This release of virtual GPU 1.1 provides support for NVIDIA GRID K1 and K2 GPUs on Citrix XenServer

Included in this release is NVIDIA GRID Virtual GPU Manager version 331.59 for Citrix XenServer 6.2 SP1 or higher, and NVIDIA Windows drivers for vGPU, version 332.83. 

nvidiagrid-config

When vGPU release 1.1 is installed on Citrix XenServer, then you will get following new options for your NVIDIA GRID K1 & K2 GPU’s.

nvidiagridvgpunew

Updates in this release vGPU 1.1:

  • Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2 signed drivers are included
  • K120Q and K220Q vGPUs added
  • nView and NVWMI supported on all vGPUs
  • Miscellaneous bug fixes
  • Additional GRID vGPU profiles: K120Q (available for GRID K1)   K220Q (available for GRID K2) both GPU profiles have 512MB frame buffer.

This release of GRID vGPU 1.1 includes support for:

  • Full DirectX 9/10/11, Direct2D, and DirectX Video Acceleration (DXVA)
  • OpenGL 4.4.
  • NVIDIA GRID SDK (remote graphics acceleration).

The following are not currently supported:

  • CUDA, OpenCL

Prerequisites for vGPU 1.1:

Before proceeding, ensure that you have these prerequisites:

  • NVIDIA GRID K1 or K2 cards.
  • A server platform capable of hosting XenServer and the NVIDIA GRID cards.
  • The NVIDIA GRID vGPU software package for Citrix XenServer, consisting of the GRID Virtual GPU Manager for XenServer, and NVIDIA GRID vGPU drivers for Windows, 32- and 64-bit.
  • Citrix XenServer 6.2 SP1 or later, obtainable from Citrix.
  • An installed Windows VM to be enabled with vGPU.
  • Citrix XenDesktop 7.1 or later, obtainable from Citrix.

Update existing vGPU environment

If an existing GRID Virtual GPU Manager is already installed on the system and you wish to upgrade, follow these steps:

  • Shut down any VMs that are using GRID vGPU.
  • Download NVIDIA GRID vGPU driver from NVIDIA.com/drivers and unpackage the zip folder. Look for the NVIDIA-vgx-xenserver-6.2-331.59.i386.rpm file
    Use WinSCP and connect to your XenServer and transfer the file
  • Install the new package using the –Uv option to the rpm command, to upgrade from the previously installed package: 
    rpm -Uv NVIDIA-vgx-xenserver-6.2-331.59.i386.rpm
    FYI – You can use XenCenter CLI or Putty to execute above command
  • Reboot XenServer host
  • Install XenServer hotfix XS62ESP1004 to the host and reboot
    * Use CTX132791 for further info how to update a XenServer single host or Pool
  • Now you can see the new vGPU profile in XenCenter and XenDesktop Studio.
  • On all your vGPU virtual machines, update the NVIDIA Windows drivers for vGPU, version 332.83
Note: the GRID vGPU Manager and Windows guest VM drivers must be installed together. Older VM drivers will not function correctly with this release of GRID vGPU Manager. Similarly, older GRID vGPU Managers will not function correctly with this release of Windows guest drivers
GRID vGPU on Citrix XenServer does not support operation with physical GPUs BARs mapped above the 4 Gigabyte boundary in the system address space.Ensure that GPUs are mapped below the 4G boundary by disabling your server’s SBIOS option that controls 64-bit memory-mapped I/O support. This option may be labeled “Enable >4G Decode” or “Enable 64-bit MMIO”.

to use GRID K120Q and K220Q vGPU a hotfix XS62ESP1004 from Citrix must be applied to XenServer 6.2SP1

Source

Download Citrix XenServer XS62ESP1004 hotfix here

Howto Install a hotfix to a XenServer single server or pool.

Download NVIDIA vGPU driver for Windows 7 32bit, Windows 8 32bit, Windows 8.1 32bit here

Download NVIDIA vGPU driver for Windows 7 64bit, Windows 8 64bit, Windows 8.1 64bit Windows Server 2008 x64, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012 R2

NVIDIA GTC 2014

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in Citrix, DaaS, Datacenter and Cloud, Desktop Virtualization, GRID, NVIDIA, vDGA, vGPU, VGX, View, vSGA, vSphere

I will in this article brush up some of the exciting stuff that NVIDIA announced last week at their GPU conference. Some of the big news was that VMware DaaS supports NVIDIA GRID technology with vSGA & vDGA. NVIDIA GRID vGPU technology will be GA with VMware vSphere in 2015, this is great news that VMware and NVIDIA is working close together and there will be a beta available later this year, so customers can start evaluate. If they wanna use vGPU with NVIDIA GRID the only Hypervisor is Citrix XenServer.

Lets look at which new technologies NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang unveiled 25th March 2014 at NVIDIA GTC.

upcoming GPU chip PASCAL

Pascal is the new GPU family that will follow this year’s Maxwell GPUs.

Pascal module

Named for 17th century French mathematician Blaise Pascal, our next-generation family of GPUs will include three key new features: stacked DRAM, unified memory, and NVLink.

  • 3D Memory: Stacks DRAM chips into dense modules with wide interfaces, and brings them inside the same package as the GPU. This lets GPUs get data from memory more quickly – boosting throughput and efficiency – allowing us to build more compact GPUs that put more power into smaller devices. The result: several times greater bandwidth, more than twice the memory capacity and quadrupled energy efficiency.
  • Unified Memory: This will make building applications that take advantage of what both GPUs and CPUs can do quicker and easier by allowing the CPU to access the GPU’s memory, and the GPU to access the CPU’s memory, so developers don’t have to allocate resources between the two.
  • NVLink: Today’s computers are constrained by the speed at which data can move between the CPU and GPU. NVLink puts a fatter pipe between the CPU and GPU, allowing data to flow at more than 80-200GB per second, compared to the 16GB per second available now.
  • Pascal Module: NVIDIA has designed a module to house Pascal GPUs with NVLink. At one-third the size of the standard boards used today, they’ll put the power of GPUs into more compact form factors than ever before.

Pascal is due in 2016.

NVLink

NVIDIA announced a new interconnect called NVLink which enables the next step in harnessing the full potential of the accelerator, and the Pascal GPU architecture with stacked memory, slated for 2016.

Stacked Memory

pascal_module

Pascal will support stacked memory, a technology which enables multiple layers of DRAM components to be integrated vertically on the package along with the GPU. Stacked memory provides several times greater bandwidth, more than twice the capacity, and quadrupled energy efficiency, compared to current off-package GDDR5. Stacked memory lets us combine large, high-bandwidth memory in the same package with the GPU, allowing us to place the place the voltage regulators close to the chip for efficient power delivery. Stacked Memory, combined with a new Pascal module that is one-third the size of current PCIe boards, will enable us to build denser solutions than ever before.

Outpacing PCI Express

Today a typical system has one or more GPUs connected to a CPU using PCI Express. Even at the fastest PCIe 3.0 speeds (8 Giga-transfers per second per lane) and with the widest supported links (16 lanes) the bandwidth provided over this link pales in comparison to the bandwidth available between the CPU and its system memory. In a multi-GPU system, the problem is compounded if a PCIe switch is used. With a switch, the limited PCIe bandwidth to the CPU memory is shared between the GPUs. The resource contention gets even worse when peer-to-peer GPU traffic is factored in.

pci-e_single_dual

NVLink addresses this problem by providing a more energy-efficient, high-bandwidth path between the GPU and the CPU at data rates 5 to 12 times that of the current PCIe Gen3. NVLink will provide between 80 and 200 GB/s of bandwidth, allowing the GPU full-bandwidth access to the CPU’s memory system.

A Flexible and Energy-Efficient Interconnect

The basic building block for NVLink is a high-speed, 8-lane, differential, dual simplex bidirectional link. Our Pascal GPUs will support a number of these links, providing configuration flexibility. The links can be ganged together to form a single GPU↔CPU connection or used individually to create a network of GPU↔CPU and GPU↔GPU connections allowing for fast, efficient data sharing between the compute elements.

nvlink_single_dual

When connected to a CPU that does not support NVLink, the interconnect can be wholly devoted to peer GPU-to-GPU connections enabling previously unavailable opportunities for GPU clustering.

nvlink_quad

Moving data takes energy, which is why we are focusing on making NVLink a very energy efficient interconnect. NVLink is more than twice as efficient as a PCIe 3.0 connection, balancing connectivity and energy efficiency.

Understanding the value of the current ecosystem, in an NVLink-enabled system, CPU-initiated transactions such as control and configuration are still directed over a PCIe connection, while any GPU-initiated transactions use NVLink. This allows us to preserve the PCIe programming model while presenting a huge upside in connection bandwidth.

What NVLink and Stacked Memory Mean for Developers

Today, developers devote a lot of effort to optimizing and avoiding PCIe transfer bottlenecks. Current applications that have devoted time to maximizing concurrency of computation and communication will enjoy a boost from the enhanced connection.

NVLink and stacked memory enable acceleration of a whole new class of applications. The large increase in GPU memory size and bandwidth provided by stacked memory will enable GPU applications to access a much larger working set of data at higher bandwidth, improving efficiency and computational throughput, and reducing the frequency of off-GPU transfers. Crafting and optimizing applications that can exploit the massive GPU memory bandwidth as well as the CPU↔GPU and GPU↔GPU bandwidth provided by NVLink will allow you to take the next steps towards exascale computing.

Starting with CUDA 6, Unified Memory simplifies memory management by giving you a single pointer to your data, and automatically migrating pages on access to the processor that needs them. On Pascal GPUs, Unified Memory and NVLink will provide the ultimate combination of simplicity and performance. The full-bandwidth access to the CPU’s memory system enabled by NVLink means that NVIDIA’s GPU can access data in the CPU’s memory at the same rate as the CPU can. With the GPU’s superior streaming ability, the GPU will sometimes be able to stream data out of the CPU’s memory system even faster than the CPU.

GeForce GTX TITAN Z

titanzholduse

This GPU is for the consumer market.
Built around two Kepler GPUs and 12GB of dedicated frame buffer memory, 5760 CUDA “processing cores” or 2880 CUDA cores per GPU.

VCA IRAY

NVIDIA have released a new physically VCA appliance with the name VCA IRAY. Price will be only $ 50.000 for 1 VCA IRAY appliance and includes an Iray license and the first year of maintenance and updates. GA is Summer 2014.

  • The big question is which GPU is in this appliance, in the existing VCA its 8x GRID K2, in the new VCA IRAY is it the new TITAN Z or a new GRID GPU?
  • Will the VCA IRAY replace the existing VCA appliance?

vcarayspecification

VMware embrace NVIDIA GRID

fathifathi

The CTO of VMware was on stage with CEO of NVIDIA and talked about their new partnership how VMware will embrace NVIDIA for their DaaS strategy and their hypervisor ESX.

NVIDIA vSGA/vDGA for VMware Daas

VMware’s Horizon DaaS (a.k.a. Desktone) platform now supports both vSGA and vDGA GPU virtualization options with NVIDIA GRID GPU’s.

The Horizon DaaS solution is available today. Navisite will be first service provider to deliver this.

NVIDIA vGPU for VMware ESX/vSphere

NVIDIA and VMware is working on with integrating NVIDIA vGPU with ESX/vSphere which will be available in Q3 2014 (BETA), and with general availability(FINAL) in 2015.

 

Source

GeForce TITAN Z

NVIDIA VCA IRAY

VMware DaaS

Webinar I did with XenAppblog – “GPU in virtualization, learn why it’s important” now available

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in 3DConnexion, AMD, Apple, Autodesk, Best Practise, Cisco, Citrix, Citrix Ready, Dell, FirePro, GRID, HDX 3D, HDX 3D Pro, HowTo, HP, HTML5, IBM, Lakeside Software, LoginVSI, Microsoft, NVIDIA, Quadro, Receiver, Reciever, RemoteFX, Server 2012R2, Splunk, UberAgent, vDGA, vGPU, View, VMware, vSGA, vSphere, Whitepapers, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008R2, Windows Server 2012, Wyse, XenApp, XenDesktop, XenServer

Hi All

I am very excited to share this great news with you all. I did a webinar with fellow CTP  Trond Eirik Håvarstein from XenAppBlog.com, and we had a special guest surprise Jeroen Van De Kamp CTP and CTO, LoginVSI announcing ground breaking stuff in the webinar. We had over 700 people signed up for the Webinar, if you was among the crowd that missed the opportunity to see the webinar here is your chance, the webinar is now available for everyone for free. There was a lot of Q/A and I will the next couple of days reply to all the Q/A and make them available in this article.

The webinar has been re-mastered and the audio & graphical demo videos is even better now  than in the actual webinar, make sure to check it out now:

Download the presentation here (PDF format)

Summary of webinar product announcements from LoginVSI, Lakeside Software, Uberagent for Splunk.

loginvsi
LoginVSI upcoming new version support’s GPU benchmark…

LoginVSI is working on next version that will support benchmark, capacity planning, stress testing the “missing component in virtualization” GPU. If you are interested you can write to get access to the beta version of LoginVSI.

Here are some screen shots from the session…. watch it to here what Jeroen tells about the upcoming version

Note if you want to get more info on the next version of LoginVSI that supports GPU, write to info@loginvsi.com subject GFX

LoginVSI_gpu_01 LoginVSI_gpu_02

LoginVSI_gpu_03

 

Lakeside

Lakeside Software Monitoring/Assessing NVIDIA GRID

Another groundbreaking product announcement was from Lakeside Software, they are about to release version 7 of Systrack that will support NVIDIA GPU Monitoring/assessing.

Application Graphics Benchmarking

The transformation of an existing software portfolio first begins with the identification of all of the actively used software packages in the environment. The added complication in the case of a project to begin advanced application delivery is the need to understand multiple facets of usage: resource consumption, graphics utilization, frequency of use, user access habits, and mobility needs. Because the state of IT is already so complex it only becomes possible to fully understand and plan with a complete set of descriptive information that really characterizes the unique aspects of every environment. Of particular interest is the ability to first identify applications that have GPU demands, and then begin to segment them into tiers of utilization. SysTrack continually collects information about software packages as they’re used and normalizes all data points for cross platform comparison. One of the key performance parameters that’s identified in this process is a graphical intensity measure (Graphics Index) that provides a way to identify those applications in the portfolio that have higher GPU demands than others. With this critical information it becomes possible to segment the portfolio into groupings based on their requirements for specific resources. By tying a general sense of which applications have peak demand to total length of usage it becomes easier to start developing a portfolio made up of different combinations of usage styles. This includes separating applications that may be used by a small set of the population with intense requirements versus widely used applications with a smaller footprint. Of course, this also allows for much deeper analytics centering on the behaviors of users that is quite important in planning the GPU profiles in use in provisioning. Figure 1 displays this relationship in a bubble chart format, this format groups applications based on their similar characteristics presenting clusters of similar applications in larger bubbles. The vast majority of applications exist in the “low graphics demand – Low Time Active” area in the bottom left, while only a select few have either high graphics demand or high time active.

lakesidesoftware_systrack7-gpu2

SysTrackTracks graphics usage frequency across on physical clients and allows you to group users based on graphics usage & frequency

A natural expansion of this is grouping users into distinct workload types to understand how best to configure the profile types and GPU assignments for users. Once the target applications and users have been characterized and a plan has been developed it’s critical to begin the process of sizing the environment. This includes determining the architecture, sizing the desktops and servers that will be worked with, and identifying resources that will be required to support the needs of the planned deployment.

Resource Modeling & Capacity Planning

NVIDIA Marketplace report from Systrack’sVirtual Machine Planner (VMP) outlines the number of users that fall into different use cases making it easier to forecast how many users per board can be allocated

With a complete portfolio plan it now becomes possible to move into the next phase and start creating a model for what resources will be required for a complete environment. Because each of the users have been fully characterized throughout the assessment data collection interval it’s possible to use SysTrack’s Virtual Machine Planner (VMP) for powerful mathematical analysis to provide deep insight into infrastructure provisioning. The first component of this involves using the profile information above to help develop a plan for what kind of solution will be provided to the end-users. By segmenting the population into different delivery strategies using Citrix FlexCast options as a guideline, a more complete and accurate picture of how the net new environment will operate can be created. An additional benefit of segmentation is the ability to take advantage of grouping by general graphics consumption to identify the number of GPUs required for the environment based on the user density information for each profile type

vgpu-profile

The NVIDIA MarketPlace report from VMP outlines the number of users that fall into the various use cases (e.g. “high” for a designer or higher end power user), making it much easier to forecast how many users per board can be allocated and in turn how many total boards may be needed

lakesidesoftware_systrack7-gpu0

This information creates an easy to use design for a set of user profiles, both for the actual desktop delivery and for the vGPU assignment. By ensuring the best possible analysis of the environment prior to the actual deployment the end-user experience is much simpler to forecast and control. This results in higher end-user satisfaction and a shorter transition time.

User Experience Optimization

After the successful implementation of the solution the environment still requires observation to prevent interruption of service and the potential for productivity impact. The best way to ensure optimal end-user service quality is to have a real-time alerting and analytical engine to collect and report instantly on degradation of any aspect of the systems the users interact with. SysTrack provides this in the form of proactive alerting, detailed system analysis in Resolve, and aggregate trending through Enterprise and Site Visualizer. An even more interesting feature is vScape, a tool designed to examine utilization across multiple virtual machines and correlate resource consumption to concurrency of application utilization. vScape provides real-time updates of all of the application usage across all virtual platforms in an enterprise, including information about what applications are currently demanding GPU resources. It also provides insight into other resource demands as well, such as CPU, memory, and I/O. This can help automate the discovery of co-scheduled or highly concurrent applications to pinpoint the root cause of oversubscription issues much more quickly. It also provides key insight into guest health characteristics with trending to correlate precisely which events may lead to service degradation

lakesidesoftware_systrack7-gpu3

Another key feature introduced in SysTrack version 7.0 is the result of close collaboration with NVIDIA to leverage APIs presented in the guest operating system. This allows the capture of detailed GPU performance metrics to correlate vGPU consumption to end-user service quality. Specifically, with NVIDIA drivers present in the guest OS or on a physical system, the GPU utilization and key metrics (see table 2 for a sample of selected metrics) from the graphics card can be captured and analyzed in the same way as CPU or other system metrics are currently in SysTrack.

lakesidesoftware_systrack7-gpu1

In Systrack 7 after provisioning users in VDI environment the IT admins can monitors performance, which enables to optimize density over time.

This completes the set of KPIs used in SysTrack to calculate the end-user experience score, including categories like resource limitation, network configuration, latency, guest configuration, protocol specific data for ICA, and virtual infrastructure. With a complete set of relevant information the proactive and trending health analysis provided in SysTrack yields a thorough analysis in an easy to understand, quantitative score that summarizes performance on an environmental, group based, or individual system level.

NVIDIA GPU Monitoring/Assessing: (Works with all NVIDIA GPU) Quadro, Kepler, GRID

 

You will be able to look at following parameters:

  • Device ID
  • Power State
  • GPU Usage
  • Frame Buffer Usage
  • Video Usage
  • Bus Usage
  • Memory Usage (Bytes and Percent)
  • # of Apps
  • Temperatures and Fan RPMS

Use this data to accurately plan and size GRID and HDX 3D Pro deployments based on actually observed usage and utilization.

Monitor users post-deployment to provide the best user experience

I recommend reading the whitepaper Lakeside Software have created:
White Paper: SysTrack Delivery Optimization and Planning for NVIDIA GRID and Citrix HDX

 

uberagent

UberAgent 1.8 for Splunk adds GPU performance monitoring

Helge Klein have developed a new version of Splunk that now supports monitoring of GPU, this was a feature request I talked with Helge Klein about in 2013, and I am so happy to see the results what he have done with UberAgent for Splunk, lets dig in what it can do.

uberAgent measures:

  • GPU compute usage per machine
  • GPU memory usage per machine
  • GPU compute usage per process
  • GPU memory usage per process
  • uberAgent shows memory usage separately for shared and dedicated memory (dedicated = on the GPU, shared = main system RAM)
  • uberAgent shows compute usage per GPU engine. The various GPU engines serve different functions, e.g. 2D acceleration, 3D acceleration, video decoding, etc.

uberAgent - process GPU usage uberAgent - single machine GPU usage over time uberAgent - single process GPU usage over time uberAgent - machine GPU usage

For more information visit uberAgent’s website.

My 5 cents

I am very excited to share my findings of some of the things I do in my company. Feel welcome to contact me at thomas@poppelgaard.com if you are interested in using my professional services if you need help with GPU solutions.

You will see more upcoming blogs from me covering this topic. End User experience, assessments of GPU workload, scaling/sizing, benchmarking, hardware supported, GPU side by side experience, Hypervisor vs Bare metal with a GPU. Watch out for cool things….

Source

Watch the webinar here (YouTube)
Download the presentation here (PDF format)

Lakeside Software
LoginVSI
White Paper: 
SysTrack Delivery Optimization and Planning for NVIDIA GRID and Citrix HDX
UberAgent for Splunk

Citrix XenDesktop HDX3D Pro
Citrix XenApp with GPU Sharing
Citrix XenServer vGPU
NVIDIA GRID
AMD FirePro
VMware vSphere vDGA
VMware vSphere vSGA with NVIDIA GRID

Free Webinar “GPU in virtualization, learn why it’s important 11th February 2014

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in 3DConnexion, 8.1, AMD, Android, Apple, Autodesk, Cisco, Citrix, Dell, FirePro, GRID, HDX 3D, HDX 3D, HDX 3D Pro, HP, Hyper-V, IBM, Linux, Microsoft, NVIDIA, Quadro, RemoteFX, Server 2012R2, vDGA, vGPU, VGX, View, VMware, vSGA, vSphere, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008R2, Windows Server 2012, Wyse, XenApp, XenDesktop, XenServer

Hi all

I am next week doing a free live Webinar with fellow CTP, Trond Eirik Håvarstein from XenAppBlog.com, 11th February 2014. (time 14:00 EST (GMT-5))

xenappblog ervik                  poppelgaard_com   Thomas Poppelgaard

This is my favorite topic and I am travel to different parts of the World taking about this subject both at Citrix, NVIDIA GTC, Citrix User Groups, VMware User Groups, other Partner Events, now this is your chance to see my webinar free and live at XenAppBlog.

FYI – there is limited seats so hurry up and sign on here https://xenapptraining.leadpages.net/gpu-in-virtualization-learn-why-its-important/

My topic is “GPU in virtualization, learn why it’s important”

  • Evolution of Virtualized Graphics (Citrix vs VMware)
  • Business drivers for virtualizing applications that requires GPU
  • User Experience – VDI with a GPU vs Shared Desktop with a GPU
  • NVIDIA GRID vGPU, Buzz, How to use it, Sizing, Limitations – Q&A

Source

Join the Free Webinar here *Limited Seats

NVIDIA vGPU now supports Win7, Win8, Server2008R2, Server2012

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in Citrix, GRID, HDX 3D Pro, Microsoft, NVIDIA, vGPU

NVIDIA have updated their drivers for vGPU. This is great so now you can even cut up the GPU more specially with support for Server 2008R2 & Server 2012 that could be used with Citrix XenApp. Before you could only do GPU pass-through and share the GPU with XenApp (DirectX/OpenGL), now each server can get a vGPU profile and share the GPU with XenApp the best scenario for TCO.

NVIDIA now supports following OS from Microsoft:

  • Windows 7 32bit & 64bit,
  • Windows 8 32bit & 64bit
  • Server 2008R2
  • Server 2012

FYI – What I see is missing is drivers for Windows 8.1 & Server 2012R2, hope NVIDIA release these drivers soon, so customers can virtualise their graphics on latest OS from Microsoft.

Source

Download NVIDIA vGPU drivers here 

learn more about NVIDIA vGPU here

Recent Comments

Dan

|

Could you tell me how much will cost this solution ?

only hard+ soft/licenses , without configuration/consultancy .

thanks,
Dan

Chantelle Olivier

|

Good day

I installed worx home to my Samsung S5.
The first time – I did not enter all the correct info. So when I tried to go in again – it did not allow me to. I then uninstalled the program. when installing the software again – it does not want to go in at all.

Please can you assist

Victor

|

Changing my playground from XD71 to XD75 and upgrading to the latest VGX is very disappointing.
I can’t see anymore the normal output for nvidia-smi command and i also lack the performance level but also the performance graphs in XenServer.
Tried to rollback and i was unsuccessful.

Thomas Poppelgaard

|

Mark – I use demo software from AMD and NVIDIA

Noman – HDX 3D is supported with XenServer GPU Pass-through and NVIDIA vGPU and VMware vDGA. Feel free to contact me at thomas@poppelgaard.com if you want me to help you get it set up.

Noman

|

Hello

Amazing setup you go there! However i read on a blog somewhere that HDX 3D is only supported on a Physical XenApp machine.. is there any special configuration changes that you had to do to make it work on a XenApp VM?

Also, how exactly do you enable HDX 3D rendering on GPU? using Citrix Policies alone?

I shall really appreciate your response :)

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