NVIDIA GRID – AppGuide (AutoCAD)

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in AutoCAD, Autodesk, Best Practise, Desktop Virtualization, End User Computing, GRID, Horizon, NVIDIA, VMware, vSphere

Hi All.

I want to share this with you all, Luke Wignall and his team from NVIDIA have created some great AppGuides, that helps with understanding how many users can you put on a NVIDIA GRID system with either K1/K2 in a VMware environment. These guides are made together with vendors such as Autodesk. The guides focus on following apps Autodesk AutoCAD.

In this blogpost my goal is to highlight the great work NVIDIA have done creating the scalability app guides and these guides helps you if you want to virtualize Autodesk AutoCAD 2015 with NVIDIA GRID and VMware Horizon. The guides are great – cause they give an idea what you would require in a virtualized environment and these can be reused for other virtualized platforms such as Citrix and Microsoft – keep in mind that results might be different. If you would like to get more informations about how the setup is configured and which methodology i recommend you read the AppGuide, you can download it in under source in the end of this article.

The appguides gives a great idea to understand the impact of CPU and how the GPU are giving value.

Autodesk-Logo-2013

AutoCAD_2016

About AutoCAD 2015

Autodesk AutoCAD is one of the most globally used software platforms for CAD design and documentation.  AutoCAD leverages both CPU and GPU to deliver a high quality user experience, and as a result, there are several things that need to be considered in architecting your GRID vGPU solution: the size of your map data, the concurrency of your users, and the level of interaction with primary 2D and some 3D data.

Results NVIDIA Appguide for Autodesk AutoCAD 2015

autodesk-nvidia-vmware

The following are results of our testing, looking for the greatest scalability while still within performance expectations.  It’s important to note that your users, your data, and your hardware will impact these results, and you may decide a different level of performance or scalability is required to meet your individual business needs. As the Catalyst benchmark does not push AutoCAD’s GPU capabilities, and was built to push the limits of dedicated hardware versus the shared resources of VDI, the decision was made to stop testing once the CPU was approaching 100% utilized and test times had climbed past twice what we were finding on the a single physical workstation with dedicated resources.  We then met with the Autodesk AutoCAD team, discussed the results, reviewed the tests in action, and physically verified that this was still within what a typical user would deem acceptable and usable. When running AutoCAD, anything higher than 20 FPS is awesome, but users generally don’t notice the difference once you exceed 30 FPS.  However, once you drop below 10 FPS, the software is going to feel very sluggish and become unusable by the time you hit 5 FPS. • 20 fps above is good • Below 10fps – sluggish • 5 fps – unusable

  • 32VM : K220Q perform better than K120Q but K120Q is still maintain avg 31FPS. 
  • 40VM : Due to vGPU configuration, need K120Q, avg FPS is 24 FPS
  • 48VM : one you hit 40 VM running, avg FPS is dropping below 10 FPS. 

AutoCAD requires significant CPU resources, so investing in higher CPU speeds and more cores will pay off on performance and scalability.  For medium to large models, K240Q performance might be better for a real use scenario. Since your own situation is different, you must test with your own models to ensure the most accurate results. The chart below shows a comparison between two different sets of VDI guests, one using the K2 and its K220Q profile, the other a K1 and its similarly sized frame buffer profile, the K120Q:

äutocad2015_scaling-01

Notice that as scale, the number of concurrent VM’s increases, there is an obvious drop in performance, and logs will show this is the CPU becoming 100% utilized.  This is a “peak workload” test as all sessions are started in unison, we would expect humans to be more staggered in their workflow.

The next chart shows results when we add that synthetic human behavior, we delay the launching of each session by 5 seconds, this offsets the tests and prevents all tests hitting the same function and impacting the CPU in unison.

äutocad2015_scaling-02
Notice that with delayed launching, or staggered starts, the performance remains high to a much greater scale of concurrent sessions.

Additional findings from this testing:
vCPU –  2 vCPU are sufficient for this benchmark, however increasing model size and complexity will change this. 
• Virtual System Memory – 2 GB is sufficient for this benchmark, however increasing model size and complexity will change this.  
• K220Q/K120Q  : both show capped FPS caused by frame rate limiting (FRL) 
• vGPU has 45 fps frame limiter for performance balancing across multiple VM

AutoCAD 2015 Users per server

Based on the NVIDIA GRID™ Performance Engineering Lab (GRID P.E.L.) findings, NVIDIA GRID provides the following performance and scalability metrics for Autodesk AutoCAD 2015. These metrics are based on tests with the lab equipment shown in the graphic below, using the Cadalyst benchmark, and in working with Autodesk and their emphasis on end user usability.  Of course, your usage will depend on your models and equipment, so this Application Guide is intended to be used as a starting point for your implementation.

autocad-users-per-server

 

Source

Download the NVIDIA GRID vGPU APPLICATION GUIDE FOR AUTODESK AUTOCAD 2015 ON VMWARE HORIZON here

 

NVIDIA GRID – AppGuide (ArcGIS Pro)

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in Best Practise, End User Computing, ESRI, GRID, Horizon, NVIDIA, VMware

Hi All.

I want to share this with you all, Luke Wignall and his team from NVIDIA have created some great AppGuides, that helps with understanding how many users can you put on a NVIDIA GRID system with a K2 in a VMware environment. These guides are made together with vendors such as ESRI. The guides focus on following apps ESRI ArcGIS Pro.

In this blogpost my goal is to highlight the great work NVIDIA have done creating the scalability app guides and these guides helps you if you want to virtualize ESRI Pro with NVIDIA GRID and VMware Horizon. The guides are great – cause they give an idea what you would require in a virtualized environment and these can be reused for other virtualized platforms such as Citrix and Microsoft – keep in mind that results might be different. If you would like to get more informations about how the setup is configured and which methodology i recommend you read the AppGuide, you can download it in under source in the end of this article.

The appguides gives a great idea to understand the impact of CPU and how the GPU are giving value.

esri

arcgis

About ESRI ArcGIS Pro

ESRI ArcGIS Pro 1.0 is a  Geographic Information Systems (GIS) application for mapping, visualizing, editing, and analyzing spatial data.  Esri recommends a GPU for best end user experience, but as ArcGIS Pro 1.0 also generates heavy CPU load, this also needs to be considered in architecting your vGPU solution.  The size of your map data, the concurrency of your users, and the level of interaction with 3D data all need to be considered when defining your user groups.

Results NVIDIA Appguide for ESRI ArcGis Pro

esri-nvidia-vmware

The following are the full results of our testing.  The baseline was the 45 second draw time sum – anything greater than that value represented a worsening UX while less would be a better UX.  Looking for both performance and scalability, we tested looking for the greatest number of virtual desktops, and therefore the greatest scalability, while still within performance expectations and the threshold of 45 seconds.  It’s important to note that your users, your data, and your hardware will impact these results and you may decide a different level of performance or scalability is required to meet your individual business needs.   Tests were also run to look for potential NUMA issues that can negatively impact performance.  This is where the physical GPU and its PCI-e channels are tied to one physical CPU, while the virtual desktop is running on the other physical CPU, so communication with the physical GPU has to move over the QPI between the two physical CPUs.  This creates a bottleneck and can cause performance issues.  However, in our testing, the application is sufficiently CPU bound that NUMA affinity made little difference. The results in the table below show the decrease in performance as we increased vCPU counts, and then the increase in scalability with synthetic human behavior (think time):

esri-arcgis-users-pr-server-2

ArcGIS – users per server

Based on NVIDIA Performance Engineering Lab findings, NVIDIA GRID provides the following performance and scalability metrics for Esri ArcGIS 3D Pro 1.0. These metrics are based on tests with the lab equipment shown in the graphic below, using the Esri API based “heavy 3D” benchmark and in working with Esri to determine acceptable performance.  Of course, your usage will depend on your models, but this is guidance to help guide your implementation.

esri-arcgis-users-pr-server

Source

Download the NVIDIA GRID vGPU APPLICATION GUIDE FOR ESRI ARCGIS PRO 1.0 – 3D ON VMWARE HORIZON here

 

Google Chrome 45.x Blocks GPU Acceleration for WebGL, Direct2D, DirectWrite with Citrix XenApp on Windows 2008R2/2012/2012R2

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in 8.1, Best Practise, Citrix, End User Computing, GRID, HDX, HDX 3D Pro, HowTo, Microsoft, Netscaler, NVIDIA, Receiver, Server 2012R2, vDGA, vGPU, VMware, vSphere, Windows 7, Windows Server 2008R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012R2, XenApp, XenDesktop, XenServer

Solution: Google Chrome 45.x Blocks GPU Acceleration for WebGL, Direct2D, DirectWrite with Citrix XenApp on Windows 2008R2/2012/2012R2

Google Chrome v. 45  have changed their behaviour of their web browser, so they are blacklisting GPUs, which means hardware acceleration is disabled by default in a Remote session this behaviour is seen in Microsoft RDS with RemoteFX, Citrix XenApp 6.5 -> 7.6 with vGPU/GPU pass-through. Behaviour is also seen on Linux environments with Google Chrome.

Issue highlightet in a Citrix XenApp 7.6 (2008R2/2012/2012R2) with GPU

Open Google Chrome and type in chrome://gpu and then you will see if your RDS/XenApp with a GPU is working or not.
With Google Chrome v 45 the default behaviour is now that Google choose to disabling the GPU.

browser - chrome xa 2012r2 cpu issue - graphics feature issue

Google Chrome experience with a GPU (Citrix XenDesktop vs Citrix XenApp)

browser - chrome xd vs xa gpu - 2008R2 vs Win7

above picture confirms the GPU is not enabled in Google Chrome with RDS/XenApp

interesting is that Multiple Raster Threads in Win7 with a GPU is disable… why lets find out.

This is properly because you haven’t configured the CPU correctly in the hypervisor for the virtual machine.
* hint I did on purpose so you can understand it can be complex to troubleshoot if you don’t configure your environment correctly.

browser - chrome win7 cpu issue fix
best practices with HDX 3D Pro is 4 vCPU and in XenServer 6.5 you configure it 2:2

Then Multiple Raster Threads works in Win7 after you changed the configuration of the CPU on the Win7 vm.

browser - chrome win7 cpu fix

browser - chrome win7 cpu issue fixed

below picture confirms the GPU is not enabled in Google Chrome with RDS/XenApp in Server 2012R2

browser - chrome xd vs xa gpu - 2012r2 vs win81

Now we have validated that the GPU is blacklisted in RDS/XA with a GPU, lets see if we can fix this.

Performance with a WebGL web app in Google Chrome

CPU is very high when the Google Chrome is running the WebGL application. This is because its using the CPU to do software rasterize of the GPU and this makes your user able to run a webgl application without a GPU, but wait. We actually have a GPU in our RDS/XA server now, why is this not offloading the CPU, thats because Google desided to turn off GPU and blacklist them.

browser - chrome xa 2012r2 cpu issue

Solution

  1. Edit Google Chrome link and after the chrome.exe add
    –ignore-gpu-blacklistgooglechrome
  2. Open Google Chrome and run chrome://gpu in the browser
  3. Check if Hardware acceleration is now working for all functions in Google Chrome

browser - chrome xa 2012r2 cpu issue - graphics feature

GPU hardware acceleration is now working in RDS/XA with a GPU in Google Chrome and CPU is now offloaded to the GPU as you can see in the below picture.

browser - chrome xa 2012r2 cpu issue fixed

 

 

 

Mac Client Printer Mapping Fix for Citrix XenDesktop/XenApp 7.6

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in Best Practise, Citrix, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows Server 2012R2, XenApp, XenDesktop

Mac Client Printer Mapping Fix for Citrix XenDesktop/XenApp 7.6

Hi all

If you have users that have a Apple Mac OSX device such as (iMac, Macbook, Macbook Pro) then this article might be interesting for you. I am helping many clients around the world and I often see more companies adapting Apple OSX devices. Specially SMB and Enterprises are adapting Apple Macbook products these days cause they are powerfull computers and have some of the best design and reliability. Many companies have no other option to adapt Apple OSX devices, so they attract the right talented employee, which are requesting this device if they want to work at the company, and you think this is funny then welcome to reality, Apple is back and more powerful than before. The good news is that Citrix can help with this and bring any app to work on these devices and secure the workspace with the Citrix Receiver where the user connect to a central and secure solution. The challenge comes when the user have local printers to their mac device and now tell IT they want to print from their Citrix session.

In latest release of Citrix XenDesktop, XenApp 7.6 if your users on Mac OSX devices, wants to use local printers and then connect to their remote Citrix VDI (Windows 8/8.1) or XenApp (Server 2012/2012R2) and then print, this is not going to work. Before this article got released users would only be able to get local printing working  to a Windows 7 VDI or a XenApp server running Server 2008R2.

If you have users running pure Windows Computers, then you are not going to run into this issue with getting local printers to work with a Citrix environment running Windows 7/8/8.1, Server 2008R2/2012/2012R2.

In Citrix XenDesktop 7.6, default policies are set to map all client printers, so you dont have configure this policy.

Summary if you have a Mac device and Citrix Receiver and local printers installed on your Mac, now you want to accomplish connecting to your VDI (Windows 8/8.1) XenApp (Windows Server 2012/2012R2) then you are going to fail, do below and you succeed.

Solution:

(how to get local printers to work on a Apple OSX computer with Citrix Receiver to a XenDesktop/XenApp 7.6 environment running Windows 8/8.1 or Server 2012/2012R2)
  1. On the desktop you want to configure, open Control Panel > View Devices and Printers.
  2. Select any Printer, for example Microsoft XPS Document Writer.
  3. Click Print server properties, as displayed in the following screen shot:
    User-added image
  1. Select Drivers tab.
  2. Click Add > Next.
  3. Choose Processor Architecture, click Next.
  4. Select Windows Update.
  5. Select Manufacturer ‘HP’ and Printers ‘HP Color LaserJet 2800 Series PS’ (if there are two versions of this driver displayed, choose the Microsoft version)
  6. Click NextFinish.
  7. Now connect or reconnect to your Citrix XenApp session running (Server 2012/2012R2) or Citrix XenDesktop VDI session running (Windows 8/8.1) then your local printers will be mapped in Citrix session and you can print.

Have fun.

/Poppelgaard

Citrix technology professional – CTP, and Microsoft Most Valuable Professional MVP, Thomas Poppelgaard provides professional services. Write to me on my email thomas@poppelgaard.com or call on my cell +45 53540356

Source

CTX139020

End user computing EUC Podcast Episode #1

Written by Thomas Poppelgaard. Posted in Best Practise, Citrix, End User Computing, Microsoft, NVIDIA, vDGA, vGPU, VMware, vSphere, XenApp, XenDesktop, XenServer

The End User Computing Podcast (www.eucpodcast.com) is a community driven podcast for IT Professionals, and the first EUC Podcast is officially “in the bag”. Thanks to all those who hung around while the roadies tapped the mic, looked at the mic, tapped the mic again – got the manual out, realised it was in Danish written in a Manga syle, then essentially turned it off and on again.. but we got there in the end.

Recent Comments

SandraSox

|

Absolutely NEW update of SEO/SMM software “XRumer 16.0 + XEvil 3.0”:
captchas solution of Google, Facebook, Bing, Hotmail, SolveMedia, Yandex,
and more than 8400 another subtypes of captchas,
with highest precision (80..100%) and highest speed (100 img per second).
You can connect XEvil 3.0 to all most popular SEO/SMM programms: XRumer, GSA SER, ZennoPoster, Srapebox, Senuke, and more than 100 of other software.

Interested? You can find a lot of demo videos about XEvil in YouTube.
See you later 😉

Thomas Poppelgaard

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Thanks Jose, I have corrected the map plus updated the map so 29 datacenters are now alive.

Jose Brenes

|

Your map of Australia is wrong. You have put the state of Victoria inside the West Australian state.

Tobias K

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Note that on XenServer 7.1, installing VDA 7.13 also works to enable vGPUs running XenDesktop 7.11 even using the newer “NvFBCEnable.exe -enable -noreset” command. Tested with an M60 using various profiles.

Alex

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So how come version 3.11 doesn’t work for application switching?